Tag Archives: academic referencing

Flipbook: Using ComWriter to Prepare Academic Writing

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Writing University Papers is Easy Using ComWriter: watch this

 

 

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March 21, 2014 · 9:46 AM

Introducing Smart Lists

A smart list is an automatically generated listing. Examples include: a table of contents, a list of images (figures, tables, etc.), a reference list (cited resources, non-cited resources or bibliography), or an endnote listing (instead of footnotes). In the writing editor simply Add Smart list and you never have to worry about updating it (ComWriter does it for you). When you export your writing project to a PDF, ComWriter creates the listing Automatically in the location where you placed the smart list, and will format it according to the Style you selected…now that is SMART!

Smart list markers

Smart list markers

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Abbreviations used in academic references

And others (et al.)

  • The latin is et alli, abbreviated to et al.
  • Et al. is used to indicate a list of authors in a reference; for example, Glassop, et al. 
  • Generally, always list all authors the first time, after that you can use the first author and et al.
  • Always consult your official reference style guide to check the requirements
The same place (ibid.)
  • The latin is ibidem, abbreviated to ibid.
  • When repeating a citation consecutively, you can put ibid. to indicate that the reference is exactly same as the previous one
  • For example, (ibid.)
  • If ibid. is used in a footnote, use a capital I: Ibid.
In the place cited (loc. cit.)
  • The latin is loco citato, abbreviated to loc. cit.
  • An alternative meaning is: in the same location
  • When repeating a citation, you can put loc. cit. to indicate that the reference is the same resource (author/s and date) and the same citation location (i.e., page number or paragraph) as the previous one
  • For example, “Smith (loc. cit.), also claims that…”
In the work cited (op. cit.)
  • The latin is opere citato, abbreviated to op. cit.
  • When repeating a citation, you can  put op. cit. to indicate that the reference is the same resource (author/s and date) as the previous one (but the citation location, i.e., page or paragraph number, is different)
  • For example (op. cit., p.3)
Tip:

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